ECONOMICS OF INTENSIVE AND SELECTIVE BREEDING
Lizanne Nel
SA Hunters and Game Conservation Association

 

Abstract
During the middle of the 20th century wildlife had almost no monetary value and was regarded as an undesirable competitor for limited grazing land. From the 1960s onwards, private landowners saw the need to protect game with the first wildlife auction in Africa in 1965 in the former Northern Transvaal. The game industry grew steadily and, during the 2012 season. 18 200 animals were traded that generated R 960 million in revenue. Buffalo fetched the highest average price per animal of all game species in the last two years, with a single bull being sold this year for R 42 million. One of the basic economic principles is that “to achieve competitive success, a business must possess a competitive advantage in the form of either lower cost or differentiated products that command premium prices.” This is exactly what the game industry is exploiting, as a recent article in a financial magazine reported that the bulk of the revenue over the last ten years was from rare species and colour variants. There is no doubt that selective breeding has the potential to generate substantial income for individuals. Consideration of triple bottom line profits should, however, be part of the equation to determine long term sustainability within the current legislative framework of South Africa.

 

Presentation Topic
ECONOMICS OF INTENSIVE AND SELECTIVE BREEDING
Contact Ms Nel
Email Lizanne Nel