COMMUNITY EFFORTS IN RESTORING AND MANAGING DEGRADED COASTAL ECOSYSTEM ALONG THE KENYAN COASTLINE
James Emuria
Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute

 

Abstract
Marine and coastal ecosystems provide many goods and services to human society; fuel wood, energy resources, natural products, shoreline protection, ecotourism among others. These ecosystems services are threatened by loss of biodiversity and degradation due to pollution. The aim of this study was to evaluate effective how mangroves are at filtering out microbial contamination from domestic sewage in peri-urban areas and how this affects other ecological and socio-economic services. Three sites in Mombasa were identified based on the level of mangrove degradation exhibited around the channel and presence of slums and industries directing their effluent wastes into the sea. Evaluation was done in February 2013 at Mikindani, Kibokoni and Nyali bridge as the baseline. Duplicate water samples were collected using sterilized glass bottles to determine the microbial load. Faecal indicators correlated significantly with slum dwellings reflecting the presumed human faecal pollution. Concentrations exceeded the permissible levels by European Economic Community (EEC standards): 1 500 to>190 000TC (total coliforms); 200 to 92 000 FC (faecal coliforms); 0 to 1 500Escherichia coli at all three sites. These results can be used to promote community initiatives for rehabilitation and restoration of mangrove forests for sustainable management of aquatic resources given continuing population pressure and industrialization in the city of Mombasa to preclude further deterioration of the beach water quality.
Presentation Topic

COMMUNITY EFFORTS IN RESTORING AND MANAGING DEGRADED COASTAL ECOSYSTEM ALONG THE KENYAN COASTLINE
Contact Mr Emuria:
Email James Emuria