BIODIVERSITY STEWARDSHIP IN THE SOUTHERN DRAKENSBERG AND EAST GRIQUALAND: EXPERIENCES, LEARNINGS AND THE WAY FORWARD
Cobus Theron

Endangered Wildlife Trust

 

Abstract:
The Endangered Wildlife Trust initiated its stewardship project in the Southern Drakensberg and East Griqualand in 2012 in an effort to secure habitat for the three crane species, Wattled Crane (Bugeranus caranculatus), Grey Crowned Crane (Balearica regulorum) and Blue Crane (Anthropoides paradiseus) occurring in the region. The initial thrust of the project is to proclaim properties through the provincial Biodiversity Stewardship Programme. Most of the targeted properties, containing Wattled Crane nest sites or high densities of the other two crane species, are highly productive farms (dairy, crops and stock farming) where conservation activities are of secondary concern. While some landowners are open to the programme, buy-in into the programme is lacking on many farms that contain critical habitat for cranes, specifically those farms with wetland habitat.This presentation highlights the challenges, risks, and achievements of the EWT strategy to secure crane habitat in the project area. It also critically examines some of the pertinent issues and concerns that are emerging as some of the properties move closer to proclamation, and explores the implications for crane conservation on those properties that will not be incorporated into the Stewardship Programme.

 

Presentation Topic
BIODIVERSITY STEWARDSHIP IN THE SOUTHERN DRAKENSBERG AND EAST GRIQUALAND: EXPERIENCES, LEARNINGS AND THE WAY FORWARD
Contact Cobus Theron:
Email Cobus Theron