3D DIGITAL RECORDING OF ROCK ART SITES IN THE MALOTI-DRAKENSBERG PARK WORLD HERITAGE SITE AS AN ACADEMIC, EDUCATIONAL AND MANAGEMENT TOOL
Carl Grossmann and Michelle Dye
African Conservation Trust

 

Abstract
The Maloti-Drakensberg Park (MDP) contains the largest and most concentrated group of rock paintings in sub-Saharan Africa. The paintings are the only tangible record left of the San, who for the past 100 years have been considered an extinct people and culture. The global significance of their rock art contributed towards the listing of the MDP as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000. Yet, the fragile paintings are under constant threat from vandalism and various environmental factors, and there is a pressing need for the digital documentation and preservation of these important heritage sites. Traditional documentation methods such as free-hand drawing, tracing, and field notes can be limiting and often require direct contact with the subject which could lead to damage. Advances in technology have provided new methods for recording rock art and there is now a need to comply with international norms and standards for digital heritage documentation. The Rock Art Mapping Project (RAMP) utilised this state-of-the-art technology in a 3 year project to create the first digitized archive of San rock art in the MDP. This was achieved using millimetre accurate 3D laser scanning, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS), 3D terrain modelling, digital video, digital photography, and extensive field capture of archaeological data for input into new electronic databases. This paper will present the results of the RAMP and discuss how the resulting data can be used to aid academic research, promote rock art education and assist in the management of rock art in the MDP.

 

Presentation Topic
3D DIGITAL RECORDING OF ROCK ART SITES IN THE MALOTI-DRAKENSBERG PARK WORLD HERITAGE SITE AS AN ACADEMIC, EDUCATIONAL AND MANAGEMENT TOOL
Contact Mr Grossmann:
EmailĀ Carl Grossmann