Abstract:

A grounded theory explaining Southern Ground-Hornbill’s use in traditional practices

Hendri Coetzee, Leon van Rensburg

Unit for Environmental Sciences & Management, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa

This qualitative study investigated the dynamics of the use of the southern ground-hornbill (SGH) Bucorvus leadbeateri in traditional practices (e.g. rituals, ceremonial acts and medicine/muthi) in southern Africa. In-depth interviews, focus group discussions and documentary evidence were used in a collaborative manner with 29 traditional healers from South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique to develop a theoretical model based on (a) the factors that contribute to the use of the bird in traditional practices, (b) the strategies that are followed in reaction to these factors (actual actions/uses), (c) the outcome/effect of these strategies and (d) the aspects that may have an influence on future strategies. Various biophysical and underlying socio-cultural factors have lead to the use of the bird in traditional practice, and this has resulted in at least six individual strategies (actions). Preliminary results further indicate that the impact of traditional practices on the bird may be smaller than was originally suspected in South Africa, but that ground-hornbill parts are frequently traded in Zimbabwe and Mozambique. Implications for future research and interventions are addressed.

Presentation Topic

A grounded theory explaining Southern Ground-Hornbill’s use in traditional practices

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Unit for Environmental Sciences & Management, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa

 

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